A gas station symbolizes college life

PHOTO BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD The gas station mural up close in the F-Wing at Cambridge

Did you see the photos of the Cambridge gas station mural in our Fall 2014 print edition? Here’s the story behind the unique art work that appeared last semester. 

BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD

Cambridge staff writer and photographer

CAMBRIDGE–Recently at the Anoka-Ramsey Community College; Cambridge Campus, Art Club unveiled a new mural at the end of the F-Wing of the school. The mural is of a retro-styled gas station that, up close, looks like an abstract painting, and as you move further and further away, it takes the shape of a more realistic mural.

PHOTO BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD The gas station mural up close in the F-Wing at Cambridge

PHOTO BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD The gas station mural up close in the F-Wing at Cambridge

This mural is an object of symbolism. The gas station represents the students at ARCC, where the fuel is the knowledge students receive. It was painted next to the stairs as a way to symbolize ARCC being a gateway to bigger opportunities.

This idea was created by a person named “Dibble Dibble” with the help of Art Club adviser Marko Marian and the Art Club. 200 hours was put into this mural, with 80 different colors being used.

PHOTO BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD The gas station mural further back, where it takes on a more realistic feel

PHOTO BY CASSIE FISKEWOLD The gas station mural further back, where it takes on a more realistic feel

This project required a lot of teamwork, which is unusual for artists, since normally art is considered a solo job. The students used latex paint, which proved to be a challenge because it dries darker and streaks.

Overall, the students did a fabulous job. It’s a gorgeous mural, with beautiful symbolism.

Related news: Cambridge artist donates artwork for scholarship fundraiser 

 

About the Author

The Campus Eye Staff
The Campus Eye is published by students of the Cambridge and Coon Rapids campuses of Anoka-Ramsey Community College. Campus Eye articles in print and online represent the opinions of the writers and not the college or the student body.